Archive for ‘Goal Setting and Measurement’

January 10, 2014

Brightworks By The Numbers | 2014 Update

by Scott Lewis, Brightworks Sustainability founder and CEO

Thanks to our ex-staffer,  great friend and lampmaker Billy Ulmer, we have updated our famous Brightworks Metrics with end-of-year 2013 data.

The results are as follows:

Metrics_01.2014

Numbers Behind the Numbers
Total Built Environment (Buildings, Campus, Master Plan, Infrastructure) Projects Completed: > 325
LEED Projects Certified >175
Total Square Footage >35 million
Total Cost $9.26 billion
Projected Impacts
Energy Cost Savings $26,056,579 per year
People We Touched in 2013 64,583 people
Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emission Savings 134,341 metric tons per year
Water (H2O) Savings 104,455,041 gallons per year
Waste Diverted from Landfills 797,325 tons

As always, our data as of December 2013 largely reflects our LEED® projects in the rating systems of New Construction, Core & Shell, Commercial Interiors and Schools. To learn more about how we think about the people we touch, read our post on the subject.

May 3, 2013

Spare Change

by Scott Lewis | Brightworks CEO

In an era of superstorms, and garbage gyres the size of Texas, where 1.2 people lack safe drinking water and, those of us working for change at scale feel a heightened sense of urgency around the issue of scale and impact.  According to a new report by the UN, climate change if not averted could push up to 3 billion people into extreme poverty by the middle of this century.  This is the Go Big or Go Home moment.

I’ve written elsewhere about the importance of having an aspirational vision – that incremental change is both uninspiring and insufficient.  But after 12 years in practice using sustainability strategies to help our clients address their most pressing issues and greatest opportunities around cost, risk, brand, talent and aligning their values with their work, we are finally gaining real proficiency in what I feel is the most powerful lever for helping our clients secure enduring competitive advantage.

Turbulent water overflow

Greenland Ice Sheet Melt – an impact of climate change.  Over the course of several years, turbulent water overflow from a large melt lake carved this 60-foot-deep (18.3 meter-deep) canyon (note people near left edge for scale).  A complete melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet would raise sea levals by over 20 feet.  Image credit: Ian Joughin, University of Washington; NASA

In the world of sustainability practice, the biggest barriers, challenges and opportunities are often perceived to be either technical or financial.  And while it is true that financial and technical innovations are urgent and important, we have found through our work on hundreds of projects with dozens of clients large and small, that the greatest challenges and opportunities are in fact neither technical nor financial.  Yes, we have to figure out non-toxic product strategies using renewable  inputs and closed loop recycling.  We have to figure out how to make buildings and communities that can run on renewable energy and function with a net-zero (or positive) environmental footprint.  And we have to figure out how to pay for these things.  But as Lester Brown observed in his inspiring exploration of possibility, Plan B, everything we need to do to achieve real sustainability, we are already doing, in places.  It’s a question of scale, resolve, fixing market failures like externalities, and overcoming huge issues like the corrupting influence of money in politics.  But the barriers are not technical, nor financial.  They are personal.

Sustainability = Change

We hear a lot of talk in sustainability circles of the Triple Bottom Line – people, planet, prosperity.  And while the ecological and financial dimensions of the equation are regularly addressed, and the social equity component is gaining some momentum in some circles, when I talk here about the social dimension of sustainability, I’m not referring to the “sustainability has to reach all groups” aspect.  While that factor, the Sustainability For All angle, is certainly true, urgent and important, that’s not what I’m talking about here, now.  What I’m talking about is this: sustainability is about change.  It means doing things differently in the future than today.  And if we don’t think about that fact, get inquisitive and ask about its implications, we’ll be stuck writing inspiring sustainability plans that gather dust on the shelf while the ice sheets melt and species continue to vanish.  If we aspire to accelerate the transformation of an economic, social and political system that depletes the planet’s natural capital into a system capable of providing lasting prosperity for the majority of humanity, we must focus heightened attention, and we have to do this quickly and well, on the implications of the simple observation that sustainability means change.  Not doing so would be akin to trying to lose weight without eating less or exercising more.

ChangeOrDie

Understanding what motivates people to change behavior is the most powerful lever to successful sustainability uotcomes.

The logic is somewhat straightforward:

Is our current system sustainable?  Answer: obviously not.

Do we wish to have a sustainable future?  Clearly.

Will we get there by continuing to do the things that created the situation we are in today?  No chance.

Therefore, we have to do things in the future differently than we are today.  Hence: Sustainability = Change.

This may seem obvious beyond words, but by not focusing on the implications of this simple truth, which we have found in our work to be the rule more than the exception, we allow tremendous amounts of energy to leak out the sides of our efforts, instead of moving us forward as quickly as we can go.

So what does this really mean?  What do we do about it?  How do we “operationalize” change effectively?  Believe it or not, there are good answers to all those questions.

Stay tuned and we’ll offer some thoughts, now that we’ve framed the question, in our next installment…

September 10, 2012

What’s the environmental footprint of your technology use? There’s no app for that.

Josh Hatch, Director of Sustainability Analytics, BrightworksBy Joshua Hatch

Director of Sustainability Analytics

Are you big into social media? Can you hardly wait for the next iPhone? And are you having trouble reconciling the environmental implications of our ever-connected society? You are not alone. If you tune into the latest environmental data from large technology firms like Apple, Google and Facebook, then you could develop whiplash from confusing numbers and competing claims.

The environmental footprint of your social and technological habits is hard to understand because most of the supply chain and infrastructure of technology companies is hidden in the “cloud” or in contract manufacturing towns. It is also hard to make sense of the net environmental impact these companies present, both positive and negative. Should we be concerned that the data centers that power all digital services are one of, if not the, fastest growing sectors of our electric grid, or placated that they are only two percent of our over-all energy use? I am speaking at Greenbuild 2012 this fall on this one issue alone.  And can social media and technology create greater openness and tools for activism that drive a broader societal awareness or corporate environmental responsibility and eventually “pay for themselves”?  It’s a muddy issue, but we can start to clarify it by identifying what the questions are today, and what will tip them in one direction or another.

The Impact of the Cloud

Google was first major technology company to get really transparent on the impact of their operations by releasing the energy usage from all of their data centers. It can only be huge, right? Actually, I was surprised at how small it was. Data centers make up about two percent of U.S. electricity use and Google’s share was less than one percent of that. Facebook more recently followed suit by disclosing their energy use and carbon footprint, and did a great job presenting some complex data and making it relatable.  In short, the carbon footprint of your annual Facebook use is about equal to the footprint of a couple glasses of wine or a medium latte.

Facebook: Sharing Our Footprint

Your Facebook carbon footprint is equal to… Image via Facebook

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June 11, 2012

What is Sustainability ROI?

Scott Lewis, Brightworks CEOBy Scott Lewis

 Brightworks CEO

Sustainability provides a rich investment opportunity for any organization – business, NGO or public agency. However, conventional approaches to comparing investment options may under-represent the value of sustainability efforts, and therefore lead to underinvestment, missed value creation opportunity and increased risk. By expanding outdated notions and definitions of the “returns” from investment options, CFOs, business leaders and managers of public or non-profit organizations can make more prudent and strategic decisions regarding sustainability opportunities.

The standard measure for the risk-adjusted opportunity of an investment is a simple equation: the benefit or “gain” of the investment divided by the initial cost – referred to as “return on investment.” Put $100 into a project, get $140 back, divide the gain ($40) by the initial investment, and voila – a 40 percent ROI.

While expected ROI is widely used by investors, our focus here is on investment decisions made by CFOs and business managers inside organizations about where to allocate their internal resources to achieve their goals.

From Conventional ROI to SROI

To illustrate the problem with the standard ROI analysis, consider the following example: You’re deciding whether to invest in an energy upgrade project that includes switching out inefficient incandescent lights with more energy efficient T-5 fluorescent lamps, replacing some overhead lighting with task lighting at workstations, and adding natural ventilation and daylighting to the space to save air conditioning and lighting costs.  Suppose the initial or “first cost” of the upgrade is $100,000, and you get $15,000 annual energy savings: a 15 percent ROI.  If that payback seems low or there is a competing use for those funds that would have an 18 percent ROI, the energy upgrade wouldn’t be worth the investment.  But is that really the whole picture?

Fluorescent Lights in an Office

Image via Renewable Energy News


The problem with the standard ROI analysis is that it overlooks some of the potential benefits of the sustainability investment, and therefore undervalues the possible outcome. The first question in doing a Sustainability ROI analysis is, “Did we really look at all the financial costs and benefits of the project?”  The first place to look for additional financial benefits is in the area of Life Cycle Cost Analysis, or LCCA.  Did your analysis take into account the fact that the new T5 lights last for 5 years, yet the incandescent lamps they were replacing only last for a year?  Did it measure the dollars spent paying maintenance staff to climb a ladder and replace each incandescent bulb each year?  Did the analysis uncover the fact that the T5’s produce considerably less heat than the incandescents?  In a building where you run air conditioning for 68 percent of the year, the cooler T5’s save you money again.

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June 7, 2012

Redefining ROI for your Existing Building

Eric Baxter, Brightworks Sustainability Advisorby Eric Baxter, Director of Existing Buildings

A recent article on FacilitiesNet.com features six steps to move a building and a team through a LEED for Existing Buildings Operations & Maintenance (LEED EBOM) certification process. If you’re a building owner or manager, I encourage you to carefully consider each step when embarking on LEED EBOM. Before you do, however, consider one other critical piece — think of it as “Step Zero.”

As consulting firm that has worked on numerous LEED EBOM projects since the first pilot rating system was introduced in 2002, Brightworks has seen many project teams successfully execute an EBOM program for their facility. We have also seen a few project teams fail. In some cases it was an inability to follow through on the six recommendations in the article.

In other cases, they had overlooked Step Zero: understanding and agreeing on their organization’s motivations and value proposition for undertaking the EBOM journey, implementing this rigorous program and seeking this type of certification.

This step is a critical part of our work with clients, and something we’ll cover at our session at the BOMA Every Building Conference and Expo in Seattle in June. Without a clear, circumspect analysis of this critical piece before starting any kind of existing building sustainability program, the project team will be challenged to focus on the proper critical path items, budget appropriate funds to move forward and get buy-in from essential team members. Falling short in any of these areas can cause a project to lose its way and ultimately fail to earn a certification.

Common LEED EBOM Motivations

Considering Step Zero gets the project on track from the start. There are many motivations for undertaking the LEED EBOM journey and submitting your building for  certification. Here are a few that might point you in the right direction:

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May 24, 2012

Silence on Sustainability: Not as golden as it used to be

Dave Newman, Senior Strategist, Brightworks Enterprise Solutions GroupBy Dave Newman, Enterprise Solutions Group

A sustainability thought leader shared a cautionary tale with me recently. His former company had received a sustainability questionnaire from a non-governmental organization (NGO). The CEO told him not to respond. The firm’s responses wouldn’t be ideal, and they weren’t sure how much to disclose. When the report came out, the cost of that decision became clear: The company received an “F” ranking. When the survey arrived the following year, the CEO instructed him to respond with whatever information the company had. Anything would be better than their current grade!

Companies are being publicly rated on sustainability criteria – whether they know it or not and whether they participate in the process or not. The newly updated Ceres report on corporate sustainability progress among 600 top U.S. companies is just the latest publicized ratings example. No doubt the results caught at least a few businesses off guard.

The challenge for businesses is that these inquiries from industry watchdogs, NGOs or clients call for complicated responses and are probably not on your ideal timeline (of, say, “later, maybe never”). As my acquaintance’s experience illustrates, sharing your progress is better saying nothing, even if you don’t have all the answers. And just asking the questions will give you a sense of what some of your next moves should be.

Why are large companies falling short of Ceres’ expectations?

read more »

March 30, 2012

Making Your Green Building Work For Your Business

When is going green a sound investment, and is it ever the wrong move?  This recent blog post from the Green Real Estate Law Journal reported on a new study citing evidence against the market value of pursuing green building certifications in certain geographical/geopolitical areas, or on certain project types.  As it made the rounds at Brightworks, one of our schools of thought could be summed up as, “So there is no ‘one size fits all’ green building solution for everyone…and this is news?”

The study focused on a small group of industrial buildings that underperformed their “non-green” peers – an effect which was especially pronounced in politically conservative counties.  This runs contrary to more common studies showing increased value tied to green building.  It asked, “…If green rental premiums are attributable to the branding of space, why would industrial warehouse facilities…benefit? Alternatively, if energy efficiency drives green premia, such effects may well be more pronounced within the industrial sector.”  Exploring questions like these with clients is the foundation of our work, because the business case for sustainability is different for everyone.

These two charts from our Business Case for Sustainability presentation (you can read our related article or  view the presentation deck on SlideShare) present sample breakdowns of how the business benefits of green building might look different for two different buildings – an owner occupied building versus a speculative building meant to be sold.

The Business Case for a Green Owner Occupied Building

Owner Occupied Building

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January 3, 2012

Rejuvenation

by Scott Lewis | Brightworks CEO

The turning of the annual calendar always brings with it a range of associations, not the least of which is the idea of new beginnings.  We mark the occasion with a ritual of making resolutions that often vanish as quickly as our holiday leftovers, and yet, we still carry this intangible sense that after all, a new year is a chance for a fresh beginning.  It is the eternal human impulse to want a fresh start, to have another chance.

And somehow, deep inside, this desire for another chance has roots in an eternal optimism that says no matter how bad things have been in the past, there is still a possibility of a better tomorrow.

This resonates strongly for those of us in the sustainability business.  How can one look with open eyes at a world with so much trouble – from war and famine to financial scandal to the degradation of the vital ecosystems that sustain our prosperity and survival, and not simply despair.  The answer has to lie in some sort of deeper wisdom, which reminds us there have been challenges in the past, whose answers were not always visible at the time, yet human perseverance and ingenuity somehow provided solutions that could not have been imagined before they were invented.

And that is precisely where we stand today in the endeavor to create a post-carbon, socially equitable sustainable economy.  As Paul Hawken said in his brilliant 2009 commencement address to the University of Portland graduating seniors:

If you look at the science about what is happening on earth and aren’t pessimistic, you don’t understand data. But if you meet the people who are working to restore this earth and the lives of the poor, and you aren’t optimistic, you haven’t got a pulse. What I see everywhere in the world are ordinary people willing to confront despair, power, and incalculable odds in order to restore some semblance of grace, justice, and beauty to this world.

That captures it pretty well:  ordinary people willing to confront despair, power, and incalculable odds in order to restore some semblance of grace, justice, and beauty to this world.

Ordinary people doing the extraordinary.  That’s what it’s all about.  As 2012 dawns and sparks in us that sense of new beginnings, won’t you join us in doing something extraordinary?

Happy New Year.

December 8, 2011

Four Trends in Corporate Sustainability

Dave Newman, Senior Strategist, Brightworks Sustainable Systems Groupby Dave Newman, Senior Strategist

This two-part post is the result of more than a dozen in-depth conversations with leading sustainability practitioners, most of them within Fortune 500 companies. We wanted to understand the sustainability trends these practitioners see to help us convey where, why and how leading companies are engaging sustainability to achieve their business goals.

This piece will explain the trends themselves. Part two will focus on how leaders are accomplishing their work and the first steps others can take to stay competitive.

In the last four months of conversations, we saw consistent sustainability themes emerge as companies move through the cycles of their business: from procurement and resource use to measuring and marketing. Leading companies are:

  • Acknowledging their supply chains
  • Examining their relationship to nature’s systems instead of single elements
  • Improving their data quality
  • Telling customers simple, memorable stories with that data

read more »

September 29, 2011

The Port of Portland – Opportunity in Systems Integration

Chris Forney, Brightworks Sustainability AdvisorsChris Forney, Senior Sustainability Advisor

In Part One of our interview with The Port of Portland (click here to read), we learned how one leading public agency integrates sustainability throughout their organization and empowers their staff to play a role. Part Two continues the conversation and uncovers examples of the opportunities created by systems integration.

 

Five Gears of Sustainability Engagement

Chris: At Brightworks, we’ve been looking at businesses and their relationship to sustainability through a lens developed by Peter Senge in The Necessary Revolution. Gear One is just complying with regulations, and Gear Two is volunteering to do a little more. Gear Three organizations are really partnering change with opportunity creation, and by Gear Five they are redesigned with sustainability as a well-defined core value in all business decisions. It seems like the Port is at “Integrate,” or Gear Three or Four. I can see that integration across your organization; it’s in your HR department and in your strategic and business plans.

Five Gears of Leading for Sustainability

Five Gears of Leading for Sustainability

Dorothy Sperry, Environmental Affairs Manager: We’re probably at “Partner Plus.”

Rachel Wray, Environmental Outreach Manager: Our alternative fuels usage is close to Integrate. We’ve made choices over the last eight-to-nine years to move toward alternative fuels, well ahead of it being chic.

Dorothy: We have an energy management strategy that includes partnerships and looks really long term at our energy use. And we buy 100% renewable energy credits to offset our energy use. We have air quality goals that are a little more rigorous than other agencies, and our energy strategy includes those goals.

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